MGDC    

Вернуться   MGDC > Development > Graphics > Pixel Art > Exchange by experience
Справка Пользователи Календарь Все разделы прочитаны

Exchange by experience Technical questions on games graph (nicety and tricks in development sprites, tiles, etc...)

Ответ
 
Опции темы Опции просмотра
  #1  
Старый 30.05.2004, 16:51
Аватар для Mihalych
Mihalych Mihalych вне форума
Hard Worker
 
Регистрация: 10.04.2004
Адрес: Road|Moscow|Voronezh|Etc..
Компания: Dynamic Pixels
Должность: President
Сообщений: 3,185
По умолчанию Finalredemption tuturials

<TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="98%" align=center border=0><TBODY><TR><TD><TABLE cellSpacing=1 cellPadding=0 width="98%" align=center border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>Bladed Weapons
Level: Basic
Type: Design

Here we will be focusing on ways to go abouts designing and creating a good bladed weapon. Most of the steps here will be basic ideas or thoughts that you might want to use If you are ever trying to make a weapon for something, it could be for a game for instance, maybe you have a character in your game and you want to give him a cool weapon to use. Well, lets begin..

</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
<TABLE cellSpacing=1 cellPadding=0 width="98%" align=center border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>Step 1
Step 2
Step 3 </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
<TABLE cellSpacing=1 cellPadding=0 width="98%" align=center border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>Step 1:</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top>Ok so first of all, we need to know the basic parts for a bladed weapon. Usually they consist of a sharp blade, and a handle. Easy right? The blade is there to cut/slice/bash/stab and so on. The handle is there so you can carry out those actions and control it's movement of the blade. In most cases that is all you need for a bladed weapon, but you could add more parts if you wanted to.. For example: you could have two bladed weapons and a chain attached to each handle. This would allow for extra types of moves and such like maybe swinging one blade at the opponent while holding onto the other end of the chain.. You can get creative if you let your mind wander. </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
<TABLE cellSpacing=1 cellPadding=0 width="98%" align=center border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>Step 2:</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top>Now that we know the basic parts, lets focus more on the blade. The blade is important because, well, it's the part that is ganna be doing the damage right? So we need to think how we want that blade to work.. In most cases the blade is sharpened, where it's sharpened depends on how the blade is designed. The basic shape for a blade is long flat and narrow with either one side or both sharpened. If you want to get creative, you can change the shape around, maybe have a jagged edged blade, maybe a blade that curves forward like a hook, or a blade with 2 more blades attached to it's sides, I dunno.. What helps is if you think how you want the blade to work, how it'll cut.. maybe you want two blades next to each other, that way it could do twice the damage. Or a hooked shape blade could kinda rip open a wound. Don't forget to make room for where the handle attaches (this might be covered up by the handle when the handle is attached). You should also keep in mind how big the blade is, metal is usually pretty heavy, and if it is too big, well, the character will have trouble carrying it.. although If it's in a game, you can bend reality. So I guess the size of the blade depends on your taste.. Here are some blade examples:
</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
<TABLE cellSpacing=1 cellPadding=0 width="98%" align=center border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>Step 3:</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top>Lets talk about the handle now. The handle gets attached to the blade, usually you'll want to think about how it gets attached in order to better understand how your weapon holds together. Usually I like making my handles slide onto the part of the blade and then have some sort of screw-shaped piece on the end hold the handle on. The handle is important because it lets you control the movement of the blade, different shaped handles have to be used by the character differently. A handle that is straight might be easily swung around and be able to do fancey hand tricks with.. On the other hand, a handle that has an odd shape may not be easy to pull off those fance tricks, but maybe the shape could add more power to the moves or do other things. Maybe a long handle could allow for a longer reach, such as a spear of some sort, or a halberd. Maybe the handle could have grooves in it for the fingers in order to provide a better grip. Yeah, you may think that this stuff isn't necessary in a game, but it is. If you don't put these details in, there will be people that will notice. The more details there are usually the better the game is, well atleast it adds to the game.. Handles don't have to allways be parallel to the blade either, you could have the blade point forward from the knuckles if you want. Here are some handles for the previous blades I showed you..

And here are the weapons put together:


</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
<TABLE cellSpacing=1 cellPadding=0 width="98%" align=center border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>Hope this basic tutorial helps you design bladed weapons. If anyone has any weapons they've designed after reading my tutorial, send me the pictures, Maybe I can add them here..</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

Последний раз редактировалось Mihalych, 30.05.2004 в 16:55.
Ответить с цитированием

Реклама
  #2  
Старый 30.05.2004, 16:56
Аватар для Mihalych
Mihalych Mihalych вне форума
Hard Worker
 
Регистрация: 10.04.2004
Адрес: Road|Moscow|Voronezh|Etc..
Компания: Dynamic Pixels
Должность: President
Сообщений: 3,185
По умолчанию

<TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="98%" align=center border=0><TBODY><TR><TD><TABLE cellSpacing=1 cellPadding=0 width="98%" align=center border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>Basic Human Proportions
Level: Basic
Type: Art

This tutorial will explain the general basic human proportions used by many people to draw figures and will walk you through creating a basic body of a human. I have seen many attempts at createing a human figure from various people, and I hope to have this tutorial be able to help those and any other who is haveing trouble to become better at drawing it.


</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
<TABLE cellSpacing=1 cellPadding=0 width="98%" align=center border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>Step 1
Step 2
Step 3 </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
<TABLE cellSpacing=1 cellPadding=0 width="98%" align=center border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>Proportion Information:</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top>Proportions are affected by age, gender, and race. So proportions may vary between people. Although even with that, there is still a common set of proportions that is used. A basic unit of measurement that the artist commonly uses is the head. Head length is from the very top of the head to the bottom of the chin. Head width is basically the horizontal size of the head. Head length and head width are constantly used to measure the body.

Most people measure up to 7.5 head lengths. So if you made the head for example 2 centimeters tall, the length of the whole figure would be 15 centimeters from the top of the head to the bottom of the feet because 2 centimeters multiplied by 7.5 = 15

The way the body is usually measured with heads is like this:
The first and top head length would be the head of the person.
The second head length would start at the chin (where the 1st head length ends) and end at the chestline at the nipples.
The third head length would continue to the waistline at the bellybutton. The top of the buttocks is on a level line with the bellybutton, in other words, the top of the buttocks lines up Horizontally with the bellybutton.
The forth would continue to the groin area between the legs (where the legs begin to seperate). The lower end of the buttocks reaches here too.
The fifth would continue to a bit above the knee.
Based on the previous head lengths, the sixth head length should end a bit below the knee. This would put the knee directly in the center of the sixth head length (the knee would be located 1/2 a head length below the fifth head).
The seventh head would end above the ankle.
The last 1/2 head would stop at the bottom of the feet.

This way or measureing helps alot and lets you plan out the body easily as you figure out where things line up. Another helpful thing to keep in mind is the half-way point in the figure.

The body's half point is the top of the femur (The bones in your upper legs that connect to your pelvic bone). This is where the length of the body above this invisible line would be equal to the length of the body below it. In other words, this line is 3 3/4 from the top of the head. If you have problems makeing the legs or torso too long or too short, this invisible line can help you easily get it proportioned correctly.

The length of the neck is about 1/4 to 1/3 a heads length. And the width of it would be around 1/2 of a heads length.

The foot is equal to twice the length of the face from the eyebrows to the chin. The bottom of the calf on the lower leg is 1 head length up from the bottom of the feet.

The arms are about 3 head lengths from the tip of the longest finger (the middle) up to the top of the armpit area. The elbow would be located about 1 head length down from the top of the armpit or about 2 head lengths from the tip of the middle finger depending which way you measure from. The elbows would align near the waistline, around or above the bellybutton. When the arms are at the side, the wrist bone lines up to around the groin area.
The length of a hand is about 3/4 the length of the face or about 2/3 the length of a head. The longest finger would be equal to the palm of the hand.

The widths of the shoulders, chest, and hips differ between gender.
In the female, the shoulders are a bit narrower then 2 head lengths. The chest is 1 1/4 a heads length wide. And The hips are 1 1/2 a heads length wide.
In the male, the shoulders measure 2 head lengths wide. And the chest and hips are both 1 1/2 a heads length wide.

</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
<TABLE cellSpacing=1 cellPadding=0 width="98%" align=center border=0><TBODY><TR><TD vAlign=top>Now lets walk through the process of creating one of these humans. We'll take what we learned from above and apply it while we create a basic body.</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
<TABLE cellSpacing=1 cellPadding=0 width="98%" align=center border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>Step 1:</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top>First we'll setup the 7.5 head lengths and draw some horizontal lines for every half head. We should end up with something like this:</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
<TABLE cellSpacing=1 cellPadding=0 width="98%" align=center border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>Step 2:</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top>Now that we have the basic layout for the body, we can also go in and calculate the center of the body, which would be 3 3/4 head lengths from either the top or the bottom lines. We also know that the knees are 2 head lengths up from the bottom of the feet (the lowest line) so we can add a line there too. Once we've done that, we can create an oval type shape for the head of the human and then begin working on the rest of the body from here.</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
<TABLE cellSpacing=1 cellPadding=0 width="98%" align=center border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>Step 3:</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top>Next we will add a vertical line down the center of where our human will stand, this will help us keep things symetrical and straight. Remember the shoulder width of a male is 2 head lengths and the shoulder width of a female is a bit thinner, so measure the head lengths at the place where the shoulders go (below the neck beside the chest area). Continue downwards putting in the chest (male is about 1 1/2 head lengths, female is about 1 1/4), stomach, torso, hips (about 1 1/2 for both female and male), legs, feet. Once you have those, don't forget to put in the arms, they should measure close to 3 head lengths.

</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
<TABLE cellSpacing=1 cellPadding=0 width="98%" align=center border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>There you have it! That is the basic general proportions of the human body. Remembering the measurements in this tutorial should help you quite a bit when trying to accurately draw it. Once you've mastered this, try moveing on to more complex body positions because you wont see everyone standing straight up, people can be in all sorts of positions, these measurements in this tutorial will help you draw the parts proportionally and it shouldn't matter how the figure is positioned.

</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
Ответить с цитированием
  #3  
Старый 30.05.2004, 16:56
Аватар для Mihalych
Mihalych Mihalych вне форума
Hard Worker
 
Регистрация: 10.04.2004
Адрес: Road|Moscow|Voronezh|Etc..
Компания: Dynamic Pixels
Должность: President
Сообщений: 3,185
По умолчанию

<TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="98%" align=center border=0><TBODY><TR><TD><TABLE cellSpacing=1 cellPadding=0 width="98%" align=center border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>Shapes
Level: Basic
Type: Art

My art teacher once gave us a paper with some shapes (like cylinders, spheres, cubes, cones and such) on it.. He also said something like If you can draw these basic shapes, you can draw anything. I think it was something like that.. Well, it does seem to make sense since everything has a form, and they are practically just a whole bunch of various shapes put together..

And so we shall begin with step 1.. Please realize that this is my first tutorial. You shouldn't have to follow these instructions step by step every single time you draw something, This should just give you an idea on how to make shapes and some things that are involved with them..

</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
<TABLE cellSpacing=1 cellPadding=0 width="98%" align=center border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>Step 1
Step 2
Step 3
Step 4
Step 5</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
<TABLE cellSpacing=1 cellPadding=0 width="98%" align=center border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>Step 1:</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top>We shall first go abouts planning what the shape will look like.. I have chosen to do (from left to right) a cube, cone, and sphere. Here is a basic outline of the objects..

Notice how you can only see the top of the cube, and also 2 sides of it.. The cone is pointing away from us and we can see the flat face of it. I simply make the sphere a circle. </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
<TABLE cellSpacing=1 cellPadding=0 width="98%" align=center border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>Step 2:</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top>Now that we have our outlines, we can now go in and add some shadows on the objects, this will also help show where the light is hitting them..

For the cube, I've chosen a light source that is somewhere back in the upper right. Since the lightsource is back in the upper right, I make the lower left side of the cube the darkest shade. Also since the light is coming from the back, I make the right side of the cube a bit darker too.
For the cone, The lightsource will be coming from above it. And since the face of the cone wont be catching any light, I made it the darkest shade. Also the underneath curved part of the cone will also get a bit darker. The thing about a curved surface is that the less curved it is, the less gradient between dark and light you will get. That is why i add more shades around the curved parts. The cube had very steep angles between each face, and so I limited the gradient between dark and light on it..
For the sphere, The lightsource shall be above and towards the front. So I made the bottom and back of it the darkest shade, I also made a gradient from the darkest part to the lightest part to show the curve and shape in the object. </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
<TABLE cellSpacing=1 cellPadding=0 width="98%" align=center border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>Step 3:</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top>We now start adding highlights to the object. This will basically be the brightest parts of the objects since it is where the light hits it the hardest..

Lets start with the cube since it will have the least amount of highlights. Why?.. because we have the lightsource coming from mostly the back right side, its a bit upwards, but it isn't above the object, so because of this, I chose to highlight the corners of the cube on top that are nearest to the lightsource..
Now remember that the lightsource for the cone is directly above, and so we highlight the curved part nearest to the lightsource. Also notice that I softened the edges of the highlight by placeing a tiny gradient around the highlight in order to make it seem more like a curve then some sort of corner like the cube. This also helps make it look less jagged.
For the sphere, I added simple circular highlight nearest to the lightsource and then added a less bright color to help make a gradient. Again, the gradient helps show the curve and shape of the object.
If you hadn't noticed yet, I also changed some of the outlines a bit, I lightened up some of the outlines that were nearest to the lightsource.</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
<TABLE cellSpacing=1 cellPadding=0 width="98%" align=center border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>Step 4:</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top>Now we shall add some shadows on the surfaces that the objects are standing on..

The main idea here is to make the ground a dark shade where ever the light will not hit it..
As you can see, the shapes are looking pretty cool now.. You can really get a sense of depth in those objects.</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
<TABLE cellSpacing=1 cellPadding=0 width="98%" align=center border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>Step 5:</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top>We will now begin softening the shadows and adding some reflective light on the objects..

The more curved an object, the less softening you need.. As you can see on the cube, the curves are so steep in that they form a 90 degree angle. Because of this, the shadow will be less softened. To soften a shadow, you basically use a gradient. The less gradient, the more sharp it becomes. Take a look at the sphere compared to the cube to see what I mean.
Now for the reflective lights on the objects. Lets look at the sphere since that one is the easiest to see the reflective light. Notice how I made it so the surface of the sphere nearest to the ground is lighter then it was before? I did this because the light coming from the lightsource is not only hitting the object from above but also bouncing off the ground and hitting the object beneath it. I also did this for the other objects, but the least for the cube since the light is behind it and I don't think the light would move past the cube and then turn all on their own and hit the front side.. =)</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
<TABLE cellSpacing=1 cellPadding=0 width="98%" align=center border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>This is the end of the shapes tutorial I suppose, Hope you learned something from this and give it some good use..</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
Ответить с цитированием
Ответ


Здесь присутствуют: 1 (пользователей: 0 , гостей: 1)
 
Опции темы
Опции просмотра

Ваши права в разделе
Вы не можете создавать темы
Вы не можете отвечать на сообщения
Вы не можете прикреплять файлы
Вы не можете редактировать сообщения

BB коды Вкл.
Смайлы Вкл.
[IMG] код Вкл.
HTML код Выкл.
Быстрый переход


Часовой пояс GMT +4, время: 15:16.


vBulletin® Version 3.6.10.
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Перевод: zCarot